Athousandgreatideas


Toilet snorkel
October 28, 2009, 5:42 pm
Filed under: Product Design | Tags: ,

toilet snorkel

In most fires, it’s the smoke that will get you, and a source of fresh air can be a life saver.  So our inventor designed a way to snake a snorkel through the zigs and zags of your toilet, so you can breath sewer air instead of smoke. Off course you can wander if he couldn’t just as easily invented the Faucet snorkel instead?

via:: totallyabsurd

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4 Comments so far
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Wouldn’t it be a better idea to just leave? What, you have a book to finish whilst your junk becomes ash?

Comment by stephe

Off course 😉 but what if you can’t? And have to stay alive while you wait for rescue?

Comment by atohms

Various of people write about this topic but you said some true words.

Comment by RigLoobby

Thats disgusting I have done a lot of plumbing and I gotta say that hydrogen sulfide is a pretty aweful thing to be breathing for such periods of time, yes if there is a fire in close proximity in certain circumstancesthis could save your life but I would rather just buy a smoke detector or two and just prevent the whole trapped thing…. Here is more info on hydrogen sulfide and humans

Identification
Hydrogen sulfide is a colorless, flammable gas. At low levels, it smells like rotten eggs. At high levels, it quickly destroys the sense of smell, so victims may no longer recognize an odor.

Low-level Exposure
Symptoms of low-level exposure to sewer gas include extreme fatigue, dizziness, headaches, irritability and memory loss. Runny eyes and a runny nose are also common.

High-level Exposure
Exposure to high levels of sewer gas can lead to a loss of consciousness, coma, seizures and even death. The level exposure necessary to create these symptoms is rarely possible in a home. It is almost always related to an industrial setting.

Central Nervous System Stimulation
In some cases, victims may experience central nervous stimulation after exposure to sewer gas. Symptoms include excitation, rapid breathing and headaches.

Comment by Ben




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